Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

2 Pages V  1 2 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> What's your favourite RPG and why?
mbyrr
post Mar 12 2017, 03:01 PM
Post #1


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,085
Joined: 17-September 09
From: Melb, Oakleigh
Member No.: 8,176



Pretty much what the tile says, cheers smile.gif


--------------------
Warhammer 40k: Wolves, Nids, Sistas.
Necromunda: Orlock, Goliath
Other Miniatures: Realm, X-Wing, Song of Blades and Heroes
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Mango
post Mar 12 2017, 03:37 PM
Post #2


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 6,761
Joined: 19-November 04
From: Adelaide
Member No.: 84



Gamma World, 2nd/3rd edition not the 'fear nanotech' modern version.

I love post apocalyptic games and Gamma World does it well with a good mix of humour and silliness thrown in as well.


Other worth a mention
Original D&D
Paranoia
AD&D 3.5
Aliens
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
chromedog
post Mar 12 2017, 07:53 PM
Post #3


Traditionally Unimpressed
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 6,122
Joined: 13-October 06
From: newcastle, australia
Member No.: 3,236



The first game I actively learned anything about was Cyberpunk 2013 (black box).
Then, although I dabbled with Shadowrun (1.0) they didn't really explain the dice pool mechanic that well, so the material for that got altered for use in my CP 2013 games instead.

I played some of the White wolf rpgs in the 90s, but my heart still remains with Talsorians's Cyberpunk2020 as my favourite. Getting to GM the actual writer of that game in a session or two was a highlight, too.

I know some people have a love for Space Opera by FGU - and the guy who wrote that game, was the president of one of the games clubs I used to play at.



--------------------

That is not dead which can eternal lie
And yet, with strange aeons, even death may die.

User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
wearthefoxhat
post Mar 13 2017, 12:11 AM
Post #4


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 340
Joined: 8-November 08
From: Darwin, Australia
Member No.: 6,393



Cyberpunk 2020 and Shadowrun 2nd are dear to my heart. Gritty city streets, huge mega corps and all of the cyber motifs - dystopia, transhumanism etc etc.

Rolemaster Standard System. & MERP was good fun.

I loved various parts of WoD - mostly vampire 2nd ed, but had good games with werewolf and some of the spin offs.

I had a long running Sengoku / Fusion system blend with really heavy supernatural elements pinched from manga and Japanese mythology.

Castle Falkenstein had awesome style about it.

Dare I say it, but I do have very fond memories of both Robotech and RIFTS games.

Lastly, StarWars D6. Had awesome campaigns playing through all periods of star wars storyline.

Whilst, I haven't played in many years, I still think about the mechanics behind Fate and some of the more modern RPGs.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mbyrr
post Mar 14 2017, 10:19 AM
Post #5


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,085
Joined: 17-September 09
From: Melb, Oakleigh
Member No.: 8,176



I've always wanted to try Shadowrun, Cyberpunk, Star Wars D6, as well as Traveller and RuneQuest.
I Kickstarted the Paranoia Reboot, but have not received it, no idea at what stage it's at!

I also Kickstarted Kult rpg, which I'm pretty excited about it. The genre looks awesome!
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/103736...laying-game-rpg

Oh and Gamma World... I'm wondering (hoping?) they make a 5e version.


This post has been edited by mbyrr: Mar 14 2017, 12:21 PM


--------------------
Warhammer 40k: Wolves, Nids, Sistas.
Necromunda: Orlock, Goliath
Other Miniatures: Realm, X-Wing, Song of Blades and Heroes
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
morsla
post Mar 14 2017, 12:07 PM
Post #6


Paintmaster Mod
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 11,129
Joined: 16-November 04
From: Kensington, Melbourne
Member No.: 3



Different games for different reasons...

1st edition Exalted - so many great games with many groups of people, including some huge campaigns and writing a lot of one-shot convention games. Similarly, oWoD'd Kindred of the East for many of the same reasons.

Weapons of the Gods was a lot of fun, particularly when people started building their own kung fu styles using the Companion rules. We watched a lot of wuxia, and the system handled those sorts of stories (secret societies, hidden martial arts techniques, courtiers and scholars holding their own with warriors) really well.

FFG's Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - I really like having success/failure and advantage/disadvantage built in to the same roll of the dice, so players stay engaged in having something interesting happen whether you hit or missed that shot.

I like Don't Rest Your Head as a nicely done micro-game, with mechanics that work perfectly for the type of story it was designed for.


--------------------
[www.morsla.net] [WATT] [40k | Burn the Witch! | Alpha Legion | Harlequins | Inaryss Eldar] | Deathwatch]
[Alkemy | Clan Walosi | Jade Triad | Avalon] [WM | Mercenaries | Cryx | River dock] [Hordes | Skorne]
[Infinity | Nomads] [Wrath of Kings | Goritsi] [WHQ | Silver Tower] [Epic | Iyanden]
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjaymun
post Mar 14 2017, 09:54 PM
Post #7


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 145
Joined: 9-October 11
Member No.: 11,988



Hackmaster 4th Edition. A completely different game to Hackmaster 5th Edition. It's a funhouse mirror version of AD&D 1E and 2E, and borrows verbatim a lot of rules and IP material from that so well-loved game. It could have been named "Super Advanced Dungeons and Dragons", because that's what it is.

Comedy/parody/satire vibe, which matches how people end up playing RPGs, and makes reading the books a lot of fun.

Excessively rules heavy, leading to memorable combats (due to crits lifted from Rolemaster, fatigue etc.) and really memorable characters (thanks to quirks, flaws and skills.)

Well nigh unplayable due to the rules load, but is worth the love involved in attempting to live up to it. I'm working on some software to alleviate this.

The best roleplaying game in the world, in my opinion, IF you can handle the crazy rules load.

This post has been edited by Benjaymun: Mar 14 2017, 09:58 PM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Caliginous
post Mar 14 2017, 10:39 PM
Post #8


Blistering Barnacle
Group Icon

Group: Support Veteran
Posts: 1,553
Joined: 22-June 08
Member No.: 5,646



Cyberpunk 2020 - gritty, awesome setting, great mechanics, great world. A high school favourite.

Shadowrun 1st and 2nd - see above.

Vampire - 1st edition. Our GM made this essentially a Cyberpunk version of Vampire set in modern day. While other Vampire players were writing bad poetry and chooinsg their favourite shades of black lipstick, we were writing ransom notes and choosing our preferred assault rifles.

Pendragon - my favourite RPG for what it is. I never played it, only GMd it, and I think I GMd it badly.

Earthdawn - 1st edition. My favourite RPG in which to be a PC. We had a great GM and a campaign that went for years and years. Caliginous was my character from these sessions.

I would love to RP again - I barely have time to check these boards as it is though with my current job...


--------------------
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Draeth
post Mar 14 2017, 11:10 PM
Post #9


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,943
Joined: 25-October 08
Member No.: 6,319



First of all I should state I am a mechanics guy. The lore and fluff of the different RPG systems is good and all, however they are also meaningless when playing the game. Different RPG books only really tell you one thing, and that is how to resolve combat in their system. You can play any genre of game with any set of rules by simply renaming things. Some people don't think this is true, but calling a Crossbow a Blaster Rifle lets you play Star Wars.

With that out of the way...

Rolemaster is my favourite RPG.
-Characters are more open than most other systems, allowing you to make the character you want.
-It is not a pass / fail system. There are about 50 degrees of success or more however you can still fail.
-It is hard for your character to die to HP loss, but at the same time you can have your skull caved in.
-Magic is powerful but takes time to use.
-You can make up your monsters / npcs in about 10 seconds with 4 stats.
-You can ignore most rules if you don't like them without it impacting on the game at all.
-Due to crits, most players quickly learn you can't go around being murderhobos for very long.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjaymun
post Mar 14 2017, 11:33 PM
Post #10


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 145
Joined: 9-October 11
Member No.: 11,988



QUOTE(Draeth @ Mar 14 2017, 11:10 PM) *
Different RPG books only really tell you one thing, and that is how to resolve combat in their system. You can play any genre of game with any set of rules by simply renaming things. Some people don't think this is true, but calling a Crossbow a Blaster Rifle lets you play Star Wars.

Interesting, and I think partially accurate observation. However, I think Hackmaster 4E's rules belie that, in that you can end up with an alcoholic one-legged dwarf with a fear of spiders, and Dig Hasty Grave as a skill, all with mechanical ramifications. Or the fact the Berserkers never have to save up gold for training, and take a corresponding experience point hit because they're all self-taught. These examples are mechanically codified in the game, and aren't combat.

There is some truth to what you're saying though, which is why I think Necromunda is an RPG in disguise, being all about gang combat yet the mechanics are such that your characters build up personality and identity purely as a result of their combat encounters. These RPG elements, along with the cool 40K gothic sci fi punk aesthetic and the fact that it requires just the right amount of miniatures (as opposed to the silly unpaintable numbers of real 40K) is why it's my favourite wargame.
QUOTE
-Due to crits, most players quickly learn you can't go around being murderhobos for very long.

Some would say that this is a disadvantage. Murderhobos is an accurate and sane way to deal with swords and sorcery fantasy worlds, as Conan would attest, UNLESS the rules prevent it. If you don't want trouble you stay in the city, which is why I think later Discworld novels concentrated on entrepreneurialism in the sane bounds of Ankh Morpork. The only other way to deal with it is to be like Rincewind, a coward always running away from constant trouble. The countryside is too dangerous, even in worlds like Middle Earth with roaming orcs. Or at least, the interesting times in it had roaming orcs.

That said, I'm a fan of Rolemasteresque crits in games like MERP and Hackmaster 4E. I'm just not a fan of their mutilating nature and lethality, which is why I make healing of permanent crippling readily on hand in games of this nature. Crit systems always act against player's interests, because they're involved in every combat and the monsters always eventually roll crits. Still, there's no other way I know of to make combats memorable, and often funny.

It is an odd thing about D&D's murderhobos when compared to reality that characters never save up for a house or a farm. Most of the real world spends all their time paying off a mortgage. I suppose on a subconcious level they'd know that your precious hog farm would just fall victim to trolls. This is also something not explained about fantasy worlds - how any commerce or agriculture or farming gets done with ravenous monsters being encountered daily. Tolkien never stops to explain exactly what a carnivore the size of Smaug actually eats on a day-to-day basis.
QUOTE
-It is not a pass / fail system. There are about 50 degrees of success or more however you can still fail.

Success/fail systems are something RPGs inevitably deal with poorly. There is something in game designer's minds which prevent them from realising that my chance of driving my car to the supermarket successfully is somewhere near 99.9% or more. If driving a car were left up to RPG designers, you'd crash or run out of fuel 25% of the time or so with a 75% Drive Car ability, and no-one would ever drive.

Real life is full of situations like that. It appears that it just bugs RPG designers on some fundamental level that the "challenge" is taken out of the game if players succeed too often.

This post has been edited by Benjaymun: Mar 15 2017, 12:20 AM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
enigma_818
post Mar 15 2017, 07:09 AM
Post #11


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,097
Joined: 30-September 08
From: Doreen
Member No.: 6,166



QUOTE(Benjaymun @ Mar 15 2017, 12:33 AM) *

Success/fail systems are something RPGs inevitably deal with poorly. There is something in game designer's minds which prevent them from realising that my chance of driving my car to the supermarket successfully is somewhere near 99.9% or more. If driving a car were left up to RPG designers, you'd crash or run out of fuel 25% of the time or so with a 75% Drive Car ability, and no-one would ever drive.

Real life is full of situations like that. It appears that it just bugs RPG designers on some fundamental level that the "challenge" is taken out of the game if players succeed too often.


I don't think that is solely a designer fault. I think the problem is the constant need for dice rolls that GMs & Players have.


--------------------
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons - for you are crunchy and taste good with tomato sauce.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
CuChullain
post Mar 15 2017, 08:58 AM
Post #12


Internet Monkey
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,536
Joined: 19-November 04
From: Melbourne
Member No.: 42



QUOTE(Draeth @ Mar 15 2017, 12:10 AM) *


Rolemaster is my favourite RPG.



It was our go-to for years at HSC and Uni. We cut our teeth on MERP and then moved to RM. Have you seen the HARP system ICE is producing now? It's kinda RM-lite (like MERP) but still has lots of depth.


--------------------
Jesus saves, Allah forgives, Cthulhu thinks you'd make a nice sandwich.

To err is human, to Arrrrr! be pirate.

We've heard that a million monkeys at a million keyboards could produce the complete works of Shakespeare; now, thanks to the Internet, we know that is not true. - Robert Wilensky
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Mango
post Mar 15 2017, 09:11 AM
Post #13


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 6,761
Joined: 19-November 04
From: Adelaide
Member No.: 84



QUOTE(Benjaymun @ Mar 14 2017, 11:03 PM) *

It is an odd thing about D&D's murderhobos when compared to reality that characters never save up for a house or a farm. Most of the real world spends all their time paying off a mortgage.


Its something I really enjoyed about D&D Expert rules box set, the details for building structures and costs, income derived from them after being built etc.

As a kid I pored over them for weeks designing castles and buildings to see how much things cost and how much my character needed to save.

As for rolemaster (or dicemaster as some used to call it smile.gif )I am more of a fan of rules 'lite' systems, let the characters and dm tell the story and interpret the dice rather than a rigid structure of exacting skills. Its not hard to assign a difficulty based on basic stats and depending on how close or far from the number the roll is the Dm decides on the level of success/failure.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mbyrr
post Mar 15 2017, 09:45 AM
Post #14


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,085
Joined: 17-September 09
From: Melb, Oakleigh
Member No.: 8,176



QUOTE(Mango @ Mar 15 2017, 10:11 AM) *

Its something I really enjoyed about D&D Expert rules box set, the details for building structures and costs, income derived from them after being built etc.

As a kid I pored over them for weeks designing castles and buildings to see how much things cost and how much my character needed to save.



Haha, same here.

The funny thing is, that level of building/income/staff/etc was never in any version of AD&D, at least from what I can remember.


QUOTE(Benjaymun @ Mar 15 2017, 12:33 AM) *

There is some truth to what you're saying though, which is why I think Necromunda is an RPG in disguise, being all about gang combat yet the mechanics are such that your characters build up personality and identity purely as a result of their combat encounters. These RPG elements, along with the cool 40K gothic sci fi punk aesthetic and the fact that it requires just the right amount of miniatures (as opposed to the silly unpaintable numbers of real 40K) is why it's my favourite wargame.


Necromunda is probably my favourite wargame too. The RPG and campaign elements are highly endearing, as well as the injuries etc which give your gangers character.

Incidentally, are you in Melbourne? (Apologies if I've asked you before!)


--------------------
Warhammer 40k: Wolves, Nids, Sistas.
Necromunda: Orlock, Goliath
Other Miniatures: Realm, X-Wing, Song of Blades and Heroes
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mbyrr
post Mar 15 2017, 09:49 AM
Post #15


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,085
Joined: 17-September 09
From: Melb, Oakleigh
Member No.: 8,176



QUOTE(Benjaymun @ Mar 14 2017, 10:54 PM) *

Hackmaster 4th Edition. A completely different game to Hackmaster 5th Edition. It's a funhouse mirror version of AD&D 1E and 2E, and borrows verbatim a lot of rules and IP material from that so well-loved game. It could have been named "Super Advanced Dungeons and Dragons", because that's what it is.

...


I've been keen to play HM4 for ages, unfortunately my group only likes "serious" RPGs, sadly, and finding people to play has been very difficult.

Given the complexity of the rules, is there a "lite" version (fan-made perhaps), that could be used for a single session game with pre-rolled characters, say, or does the GM need to have the rules down pat first?
Just thinking if there were some "lite" rules I could run a one-off session to try to entice people in. tongue.gif



--------------------
Warhammer 40k: Wolves, Nids, Sistas.
Necromunda: Orlock, Goliath
Other Miniatures: Realm, X-Wing, Song of Blades and Heroes
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mbyrr
post Mar 15 2017, 10:15 AM
Post #16


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,085
Joined: 17-September 09
From: Melb, Oakleigh
Member No.: 8,176



I haven't really given my 2c, so here goes:

D&D Basic (Red Box):
My first foray into rpg back around the mid-80s. I really enjoyed the system since in retrospect it was very fluid and not rules-heavy. It was easy to capture the theme through immersive narrative.

AD&D 2nd Ed:
After Basic and AD&D 1e, I really liked the heavier rules of AD&D 2e (basically cleaned up 1e) and the zillions of character options (via the Kits). It was possible to create a non-combat character, which meant more emphasis on role-play vs hack-n-slash. We had an awesome DM back in the early 90s that was great at homebrew stuff, plus he could be a mean mofo which meant you couldn't get away with ridiculous things and promoted thought and consideration.

Hunter Planet:
Created by a local Melbournite back in the mid-80s, a d10 system very light on rules and with a pretty ridiculous premise (basically you play an alien who comes to Earth (Dirt) to hunt its inhabitants (think Predator but with silly aliens)). The game was purely for single-session entertainment purposes. We used to play it at lunch in high school. I recently found my old books, and have been meaning to run a game out of nostalgia. It would make an excellent convention game imho.

Call of Cthulhu (7e):
This is one of the games I enjoy most nowadays. There are a couple of top-notch CoC GMs in Melbourne, who really show how to immerse a group of players (background music, visuals, handouts, etc). Personally I feel that out of all the genres I've played the Lovecraft Mythos is the most immersive (if done right). You can really leave a session feeling chilled and freaked out! I've only started playing since the release of 7th ed (latest version).
What I really love about the BRP system is there are only a few basic mechanics. It's a percentile skill system, and not combat-oriented. I suppose it is more a storytelling system like WoD (which I've never played), with a focus on mystery and problem solving. What is most intriguing, if you're familiar with the Lovecraft Mythos, is that survival is not guaranteed: in fact it's highly unlikely investigators will survive. This actually makes it rather interesting from a player perspective. For example, take other games like D&D, players become very attached to their characters. This is not quite the case with CoC, in fact character demise via exotic bloody-curdling deaths by indescribable monstrosities can be even more fun than surviving!
(I've tried running my D&D game with a similar vibe, and my players don't like it at all!)

D&D 5e:
After a hiatus from D&D for awhile (pretty much skipped 3e and 3.5e, and played 4e briefly but didn't like it), I picked up 5e when it was released. The ruleset is pretty streamlined and fluid, reminiscent of Basic with the bonus of being able to make it as heavy as you want. My group is on the tail-end of the Tyranny of Dragons campaign which I've been DM'ing over the past couple of years (my first DM since the 80s!). While I like the lightness of the game and focus on narrative, I do feel there is something missing, though it could just be my group of players (who are very combat-focused). I'll be running the Ravenloft campaign next, as part of a homebrew, with a different group, so interested to see how the game changes with different player dynamics.


--------------------
Warhammer 40k: Wolves, Nids, Sistas.
Necromunda: Orlock, Goliath
Other Miniatures: Realm, X-Wing, Song of Blades and Heroes
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Olaf the Stout
post Mar 15 2017, 10:51 AM
Post #17


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 1,808
Joined: 13-May 08
From: Adelaide
Member No.: 5,481



I'd probably have to say D&D in its various incantations, due to the fact that its been the main RPG I've played for about 20+ years now. We're currently playing a 5E game, having switched about 12 months ago after 10 years of running a 3.5E game.

I've found that, over the years, I've moved from caring more about the awesome stuff my character could do, to now wanting to tell/be involved in a really cool story. So 5E, with it's lighter ruleset works well for that.

As for other RPGs I love:

- Feng Shui for it's over the top, Jackie Chan-style combats. So much fun setting up a fight scene and seeing what fun stunts the players come up with.

- Call of Cthulhu for horror (especially good when players are used to D&D, the powerlessness and mortality of CoC characters makes for a nice change, as they realise that they have to approach things differently).

- Paranoia, so long as it's with the right group. I tried to play it with my regular D&D group and they totally didn't get the backstabbling, scheming and conniving that the game should have, even though I thought I had explained how it was different from your regular "let's all work together" RPG.

- XCrawl. It uses 3.5E D&D rules as it's basis and is sort of like a cross between pro wrestling and The Running Man (as in the 90's Schwarzenegger movie). I'm not a pro wrestling fan, but my group has had good fun with this when I've run it as a couple of one-shots.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjaymun
post Mar 15 2017, 02:51 PM
Post #18


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 145
Joined: 9-October 11
Member No.: 11,988



QUOTE(mbyrr @ Mar 15 2017, 09:45 AM) *

Incidentally, are you in Melbourne? (Apologies if I've asked you before!)

No, sorry, I'm effectively in Perth, for most intents and purposes.

I'm from Hobart via Brisbane (the nation's redneck capitals) and so I detect how it's a whole different world over here. Three hours behind the rest of the nation. I understand why Western Australians feel different to the east and have considered seceding. The only way I really feel connected with the eastern states now is this site, and Triple J.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Caliginous
post Mar 15 2017, 05:44 PM
Post #19


Blistering Barnacle
Group Icon

Group: Support Veteran
Posts: 1,553
Joined: 22-June 08
Member No.: 5,646



QUOTE(Draeth @ Mar 14 2017, 10:40 PM) *

First of all I should state I am a mechanics guy. The lore and fluff of the different RPG systems is good and all, however they are also meaningless when playing the game. Different RPG books only really tell you one thing, and that is how to resolve combat in their system. You can play any genre of game with any set of rules by simply renaming things. Some people don't think this is true, but calling a Crossbow a Blaster Rifle lets you play Star Wars.


This isn't always true. Pendragon is good example. I get the sentiment but it's over simplifying things a little.


--------------------
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
wearthefoxhat
post Mar 15 2017, 06:55 PM
Post #20


Member
*

Group: Veteran Members
Posts: 340
Joined: 8-November 08
From: Darwin, Australia
Member No.: 6,393



@ Caliginous - are you still in Darwin?
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

2 Pages V  1 2 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 10th December 2019 - 03:57 AM