Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Canvas Eagles
WargamerAU Forums > Wargaming Clubs Australia and NZ > QLD > SEQ Historical Gaming
Pages: 1, 2, 3
b20f08
Planning on running a CE campaign that will kick off publicly around October time. For now, I will be playtesting the scenarios (there are 6) to hone my limited gaming skills. tongue.gif

Acknowledgement: the entire campaign was designed by a woman named Lisa, so all due credit to her and her permission to allow these games to continue to live on. The campaign files themselves are available from the Canvas Eagles website.

Image
First scenario is Fokker Scourge, a well-known moment of aerial warfare history when the Eindekkers made their presence known. Heavy Allies losses forced design improvements but not before the Germans had shot a lot of Allies planes down.

Will post batreps for each scenario played (solo, mind you).
=================================================
EDIT POST: 17 MAY
Updated the above batmap (forgot the balloons). The target are the balloons which the Allies have to destroy if possible. But to do so, they have to cross the German trenches, traverse open ground before hitting the German ack-ack positions and patrolling German fighters.

The list for the German planes is small but rare: Albatros C-I, Aviatix C-I, Fokker E-III (Eindekker), and the Taube. For the Allies, their list of planes to select from include: Avro 504, BE2b/c, Bristol Scout C, Caudron G3/G4, Morane Saulier L/N, Spad A2, Vickers FB5, and Voison.

Just by a quick look, this could be run as two separate flights - one British-led bombing run and the other, a French-inspired bomber group. The Germans have their first ever military aircraft - the Taube, and the first Albatros - the C1 version. Both are nothing in comparison to the Eindekker.

Some planes can be eliminated from the day missions while some work well at night - Avro 504 and the BE2c (both with Lewis mounted MGs). The French could probably run this as a daylight mission with their Voison bomber and the Caudron. The MSL and Spad A2 can provide escort perhaps?

Will attempt this first as a small solo mission - both day and then night. Then I will go for a big mission - both groups together.

The Allies enter the game within 3 hexes from the left (marked light red). This area also happens to be the German trench lines. So, the planes have to be careful not to be at Altitude 1 or 2 lest they get shot up by ground fire. The bombers then cross open ground before striking the light green area where the German aircraft will be deployed. There, they will attempt to locate and shoot down the two balloons and then escape back the way they entered. The area is peppered with AA guns. The patrolling German planes will add to the misery.

Batreps to follow once played. Cheers.

NOTE: These batreps will be solo games using my version of solo CE.
==========================================================
EDIT POST: 17 MAY
For those wanting to participate, you're likely to need six planes: one plane per side in both Early and Late War plus two of your own preference for either period.

Example list might look like this:
Early War Allied - Avro 504 A.
Early War Central Powers - Fokker E-III (Eindekker).
Late War Allied - Sopwith Camel.
Late War Central Powers - Albatros D-III.
Bonus planes: Early War - Sopwith Triple. Late War - Fokker D-VII
Note: All these planes above are readily available commercially. If you want to go specifics, however, then you might have a bit of a problem locating many of the "uncommon ones" because they're not as popular or are no longer produced. But you can field the following "mixed list" if you have connections and are able to ask them nicely:
Early War Allied: Morane-Saulnier N
Early War Central Powers: Haberstadt D-II
Late War Allied: SE5a
Late War Central Powers: Fokker Dr-1
Bonus planes: Early War - Voison 3. Late War - Pfalz D-III
b20f08
Batrep: 3 BE2cs attacking enemy balloons deep in their territory. They had to cross enemy trenchlines, no-man's land, and then work through heavy AA placements, and roving E-III patrols to target the two balloons (light blue hexes). 3 Red chit hits would down these puff balls. The English had twelve turns to do it. They made it in eleven. And eventually got home without any losses. Germans had a bad dice roll day losing three planes - two E-III and an Albatros C-I. Victory to the English. Will replay this using the French this time in a much larger force; and so will the defending German air patrols. Should prove to be a massacre. Cheers. A couple of pics from the game. Batrep on blogsite.
Image 1
Opening move
Image 2
One of the E-III is shot down when its tail was shot up by the rear gunner on one of the BE2cs
Image 3
Second E-III is downed by the English as they commence their successful attack on the balloons.
Image 4
Image 5
The German pursuit is all over the show. In the confusion another German is downed when a lucky shot hits the fuel tank on the Albatros C-I and it explodes. The English are on fire! (pun intended).
Image 6
The pursuit is reaching a peak but not one that is fatal however. The German pursuit consists of an E-III and an Aviatik C-1a. Neither planes pose any serious threat as the English continue their tight flying which contributes to their eventual success.
[url=https://wargamesandwritings.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/turn-25.png]Image 7[/img]
End of game. English exit the board intact. German pursuit can only rue the day they came up against Roger Fitch and co.
Entertaining solo game. Cheers. armata_PDT_34.gif
b20f08
There is supposed to be a major rewrite (upgrade) of the rules to make it consistent throughout (the difference between the 2016 cheat sheet and the core ruleset for instance). But that talk, that hope, was heard of last year. What's happened since has been nothing to crow about. It's a shame as the ruleset does need a facelift. Hard to say what the CE people is doing to address the major complaints.

Some of these major complaints include fixing the Damage aspect, ie. it doesn't work as it should, rewriting the core ruleset to make it consistent with the current mode (the 2016 Quick Reference Sheet) that we use as the DS. Improving the aircraft profile sheets (correcting some obvious errors and including new aircraft) is another upgrade needed.

One of my complaints is more logistic than command - the very real lack of "other aircraft" availability here in Australia. It's possible to obtain many of them from overseas, but it tends to be a costly endeavour due to the exorbitant postage. Kudos to those who acquire their "other aircraft" from ebay and other auction sites. But local retailers offer a very limited range and they tend to disappear off the shelf quickly for some strange reason. biggrin.gif

I seriously doubt you are ever going to obtain an Aviatik C1a now or any other time in the future. And, frankly, why would you? Unless you are re-fighting a historical moment using the correct aircraft, no point in having a plane that not likely to see the tabletop any time soon.

What is presently available locally is often inconsistent in terms of supply. Retailers aren't likely to stock a items that don't sell in high volume. Simple business sense, I guess.

Scratch build is probably the last option if you're that desperate to field an Aviatik. Or convert to Wings of Glory in the hope it carries it. Their (WoG) greater availability of aircraft is a strong argument for switching to the scale. But there is some appeal with staying with 1/72 if you still prefer the build and play approach. Wings of Glory 1/144 scale offers the convenience of ready made and beautifully painted models. In the end, it comes down to preference.
Blackhearts Reaver
What scale is this? Is it like the old game Blue Max? it used to have counters.

We made a larger scale version with Plastic models and a much larger Hex map.

b20f08
QUOTE(Blackhearts Reaver @ May 20 2018, 05:46 PM) *

What scale is this? Is it like the old game Blue Max? it used to have counters.

We made a larger scale version with Plastic models and a much larger Hex map.

Yep, it's from that same lot that produced Blue Max. Eric Hotz owns Canvas Eagles now. Canvas Eagles is played in 1/72 scale planes and 1/144 planes. There is another scale they list on their website but honestly this can go any scale from 1/35 to 1/600 if you want. Just need the planes.

I'm a recent arrival to the game and the blurb claims a 4 by 4 board for individual dogfights. Large scale game, as you point out, can go much larger. Just limited by numbers playing. Larger numbers allows for single player/single plane. Smaller numbers means single player/multiple planes.

Currently planning on running an open campaign starting October using Lisa's campaign. A small group of us are currently getting up to speed with the game for now.
b20f08
Hi again. Skipped Scenario Two and jumped straight into Scenario Three - Bloody April 1917.

Some flight overviews of the latest solo game - a mammoth twenty-six plane effort. Taking me days to do this one because I am in no rush (it's solo after all). The pace is also allowing me to fine tune some of the solo rules.
Scenario 3a
Turn Two. Germans are coloured grey, red, and black; Allies are blue, brown, and green. Gone with every plane (and some) from the scenario listing (that you're allowed to use).
Scenario 3b
End of Turn Seven. Lots of trenches smoking meaning nothing's going according to overall game plan. Gotta love chaos.
b20f08
Happy to share the solo version I've created. Will provide a link shortly in case you're intrigued enough and lack a live opponent. armata_PDT_34.gif
b20f08
Link to my solo adaptation of the CE game. I've also included my version of the current Damage Table/Chit format used in the game. I didn't like either versions and decided to make a simplified one. I'm a simple guy.

Solo adaptation

By all means leave comments - favourable or otherwise. Every bit helps. armata_PDT_37.gif
b20f08
Hi
Been busy finishing off this game which is proving to be a mammoth exercise in bookkeeping. Full batrep will feature in the August issue of Quarterstaff. The scenario brief gives a timeframe of either thirty turns or finishing before eleven pm. Well the latter was exceeded several times as I got obsessed with finishing this scenario. So the former is how this played therefore. Here are the map overviews of the thirty-turn game then. Every turn from Turn 8. Cheers.
Turn 8
Turn 9
Turn 10
Turn 11
Turn 12
Turn 13
Turn 14
Turn 15
Turn 16
Turn 17
Turn 18
Turn 19
Turn 20
=====================================================
Will post Turns 21 to 30 tomorrow. Cheers.
b20f08
Turns 21 to 30
Turn 21
Turn 22
Turn 23
Turn 24
Turn 25
Turn 26
Turn 27
Turn 28
Turn 29
Turn 30
====================================================
This was an epic game because of time and effort involved. Next scenario will be Passchendale 1917. This time I won't be throwing all the aircrafts into one lump and see what happens (like a washing machine). Cheers.
b20f08
Scenario 4: Passchendale
Kind of like this scenario because it's a bit less frenetic than the last one played. A bit more explanation on the blogsite in a more sombre tone. This is the slightly insane version. Cheers.
Start
(Allies on the left in four "squadrons"; Central Powers on the right in their airfield locations: Austro-Hungarians at the top, Germans at the other two)

"In the brown corner, wearing red, white and blue breadsticks are the Allies - Monsieur Nieuport. Age: 27, or is it the twenty-seventh child? He does like shooting up opposing planes for a hobby. He is quite fragile but very zippy. Then there is his partner in accomplice, Monsieur Spad (with the same rugged good looks as the ex-Mr Jolie). He is also fast, some say so fast, he's gone......! He is young however, very brash.

To counter that Gallic temper, as allies, we have the stoutly stately Sassenachs and their Hibernian allies (further south dressed in Scottish blue). Riding suitably nicknamed alias chargers named Brisfit and Bullet consecutively, they both come with quite a punch. Some might say deadly. The Irish, however, would dispute that claim calling it, "Rubbish!. It's all rapid, bejeebers! As clear as the aftermath of a pub crawl on St Pats day."

Confronting them, with their Pflaz-ers and Phonix-es, are the various "tribes of Teutons". Dressed to kill in their monochronic catatonic temperaments, our hybrid confederation of German-sneezing patrots (from a different mother I might mention) are both ready and capable of throwing argument after argument at the enemy under the guise of defending the good name of the Kaiser Willi and Emperor Franzy.

Turn 1
Ever seen a breadstick food fight? Me neither. But if you could imagine it was so, then this might not be that moment. With their HUD-less flight caps and wiper-goggles (neither of which were invented in time for the War to end all Wars), our intrepid knights of the air clash right from the get-go. And, oh the calamity, oh the ho-rror, oh the lack of a decent canopy to keep the chilly air from freezing one's precious jewels (or in the case of the passenger, their b-jewels), the clashes in the skies above the trenches was a sight for sore eyes. Debris does that sometimes if you're not careful...

Turn 2
The chaos was...well....chaotic! Interesting as well and also unexpected in places. The Brisfit boyz could not lay a bomb on the their intended target - the rail hex - straight up. It was even lit up as a white thingy; but the avatars could not park a penny there. Which pleased the high command sitting in his lowdown bunker as reports flooded in on the high tide. At least one crew of the Brisfits got fed and took voluntary bullets from their counterparts in protest at the lack of a decent bombsight (two nails in the floor does NOT make a bombsight, buddy. Especially when the nails are German ones!)

The Scottish laddies were game enough to try formation flying to start with, but quickly surrendered their enthusiasm when a solitary German pilot came along and started singing Silent Night in an atrocious Pictish accent.

Up "north" a-ways, the Gallic temperament was reaching garlic proportions, so much so the Austro-Hungarians fled from them as they made tempting approaches for some escargot and pinoir while reciting Fluabert and Vincent Hugo (not the famous writer but a nephew who was a bad writer of puns).

That's the abridged version of what's been happening thus far. More tomorrow with Turns 3 and 4.
b20f08
Turn 3 and 4 sees the first casualties.

Turn 3
Dargen's beautiful solo flying is suddenly interrupted by that garlic-smelling French rascal Pierre Saint Jacques. Having recently gained his certification of mastery of the Immelmann manoeuvre, the wily Frenchman used it upon the oblivious Austrian flight commander. And over the skies of his home airfield too. Elsewhere, not much is happening as the various flight crews enjoy their in-flight meals thoughtfully provided by their various base catering services. The Scots though have no catering service and are therefore forced to boil up their own porridge in their open cockpits. How they manage to maintain formation is one of the mysteries from the Great War.

Turn 4
Carstairs and Witherspoon (his observer-gunner-bombadier-best buddy-rugby captain-wife's lover) race to the second train target, protected by Maunchenleib, known as the Munchkin Maniac. As they release their bomb, the pair are attacked by the German. In spectacular fashion there are two explosions. Elsewhere, everyone is quietly enjoying their in-flight servings, although Klost enjoys his meal so much he goes into a spin of joy.

Turns 5 and 6 tomorrow. Cheers.
b20f08
Things get interesting in Turns 5 and 6

Image 5
As Francoise Guiscard was eating his in-flight hor d'ouvres (courtesy of the ground crew back at his base), his plane began to shake and shudder. Suddenly flames erupted from the front of his SPAD. Puzzled, he finished his eclair as there was a sudden explosion from the engine. By the time he had finished his fine 1911 Rhone valley red, he was acutely aware his cockpit was disintegrating around him. With assured Gallic aplomb, he stood up and saluted his country of origin as his aircraft slowly wound down and plummeted into the ground. Vive France!

Image 6
With the sudden unexpected passing of Guiscard, who was President of his group of young French socialist radicals known as Les Radis Rougeaux and was considering a future in politics, the French went into a lather of frenetic action pursuing anything with a Maltese cross on it, but not before finishing off their dessert, a selection from Madeleines and Tarte Tartin as well as colourful Macarons. Mmm.....

The more dour (and some might say, dough-faced) English fliers had finished their crumpets and tea and resumed their respective missions. Thomas and Hill made for the first train hex accompanied by the silent Macintosh. Jurgens and one of the "vons", assigned protection duty of this important rail position, saw this sneaky approach and reacted. Like idiots attracted to a survey instrument, the Germans zeroed in on the English.

Elsewhere, meal times were done (except for the Scots who were still boiling up their porridge - Macintosh had boiled sweets so binned his porridge hurling it out his cockpit. It landed in a peasant's field where it somehow survived, thriving to become a well-respected business owner of the local bistro), the trio made for the target site.

Confusion reigned elsewhere as complaints about the in-flight meals (not all came from the same cooking squadrons) meant there was some disorientation involved. Pretty colours on the map though. smile.gif

Turns 7 and 8 tomorrow. Cheers.
b20f08
Turns 7 & 8

Image 7
After an in-flight dinner like that, everyone is feeling a little contented and start pairing off for the recreational activities that often accompanies flying services such as this get-together. While some are lazily waltzing about in the skies above, others are tearing for one another like doing a tango. Some are even smoking although generally smoking involves a pipe and some tobacco, not some flaming pile of wood and canvas speeding around at several thousand feet.

Image 8
Thomas-Hill, to relieve some of the weight they are presently feeling, decide to deposit a thank you message to the Germans for their hospitality. Elsewhere, one of the Germans is so charmed by their encounter that they start to spiral towards the ground.
b20f08
Turns 9 & 10

Turn 9
BOOM! Pew-pew-pew. Bugger! Ouch! Watch it! Och aye! Celtic! Rangers!
Scratch one train hex, said Thomas as he glanced down at the destruction caused. Elsewhere, Jurgens became the second Central Power pilot to succumb to that common pilot's disease - death - when he is targetted by McAllister. The Scotsman is in a foul mood because he had to throw his porridge away at the precise moment it was cooked.

Turn 10
With the death of the Occidental Express, attention now switches towards the large great stores dump known as the Great Southern Land (suggested by the commandant of the supply depot, Major Hans Orff). This venue is where Thomas-Hill are heading, trailed by some of the Allied fighters. Blocking them, though, is the gatekeeper, Zuhl Strasser. Of course, the approaching Allies could not understand the frenetic hand gestures from the tiny German pilot.

Turns 11 & 12 tomorrow. Cheers.
b20f08
Turns 11 & 12

Turn 11
Things heat up as complaints over the catering reaches pitch-fever. Words are exchanged; bullets soon follow. In a case of a conga line gone wrong, Macintosh -- he of the Brave mould -- whose sacrifice allowed Thomas & Hill a clear run at the train hex is soon downed after a punishing run-in with von Braune. But revenge is quickly dished out -- a Gallic delicacy -- as Mathieu jumps on von Braune's tail and peppers his plane throughout.
Elsewhere, Jacques tilts over in his encounter with the sauerkraut Strasser. Maunchenleib and Thomas have "words". Hill's response though was telling. The German backed off.

Turn 12
The disputes grow intensely as tribal differences rise to the surface, like a badly spelled souffle. Puff went von Schaumburg, followed by Klost. Jacques is continuing to spin like a top. Thomas is closing in on the stores hex. Perhaps he can find an ice bucket for his bottle of champers? Hill is giddy with excitement as he clutches the bomb release stick.
b20f08
Turns 13 & 14. armata_PDT_34.gif

Turn 13
The sobriety test was invented last century. Random fact. The Allies are gaining dominance as the Central Powers slowly lose interest. Dessert and more fine wine (the vintage from 1911 was particularly good, so it is claimed) was shared among the pilots whose vision became impaired. Some even enjoyed a quick power nap of a few seconds. Rumour has it that Thomas and Hill carried a blow-up lilo for such occasions. Pretty damned inconvenient of them, what?!

Turn 14
A couple of explosions soon woke everyone up. Strasser was quite disoriented by the noise he chose to depart, claiming an ear infection (the howling wind rending his torn-up aircraft may have contributed to his sensitive ears accident). Among the losses was Hoche, whose fine yodelling was a source of much pleasure, attracting the ire of several Allied planes along with one of the notable stores hex. Yellow is not a good camouflage colour, so it would appear. Certainly the mud and splatter of below, there is a clash of vibrancy.

Turns 15 & 16 tomorrow. Same cat channel. armata_PDT_37.gif
b20f08
Turns 15 & 16 - The Fuel Crisis

Turn 15
One target left. One bomb left. One German left. One nation buggered. With only himself to egg on, Maunchenleib races north paralleling the tiny Brisfit fighter-bomber. All around are heard choruses of "Alouette" and "Scotland the Brave". Such national pride is enough to coax you from your seat. But who would fly the airplane?

Turn 16
Pulling out his abacus, Rory McAllister began some calculations. He soon realised that if he went variable, he'd get a better deal on his mortgage on his wee boat back in the Hebrides. He beamed flashing perfectly aligned teeth, dazzling his companions.
The French pilots, however, were mulling about like a gathering storm. They were fast running out of fuel. All the wine and other spirits had been consumed; and they were still some ways from safety. What to do? One of them stayed to assist the Scots who were still frugal in their consumption and had volunteered to remain behind to protect Thomas and Hill. The rest turned and made for their own lines, conscious that some of them would be gliding the rest of way.

Turns 17 & 18 tomorrow.
b20f08
Doing these scenarios is much-needed practice, not that it will result in being a better player: for that one needs a live opponent. But you lie to yourself a lot sometimes. Oh well...

Following the phases structure of Canvas Eagles helps when first learning the game. After familiarity however, it's not uncommon to integrate the subsequent damage, recovery and problem phases within the combat phase which is expanded. The same will apply for the preceding phases - Tailing, Maneouvre, Fuel expenditure: more often that not, the fuel expenditure becomes part of the Maneouvring phase. The Tailing stands alone because of its unique application.

With all this "adjustment", it's fair to claim a more simpler format of,

(1) Tailing
(2) Movement (incorporating Maneouvre selection and Fuel Expenditure); and,
(3) Combat (involving the Damage, Recovery, Problem and Fire/Smoke/Extinguishing)

Tailing stands alone because of its function which applies to all aircraft, and the ramifications held for both participants affects movement.

Movement, as proposed above, seems fairly accepted universally that it puzzles me why they chose to distinguish it into three elements.

Combat covers a broad spectrum of activities. Separating them into different phases seems counter-intuitive. Example: firing weapon has consequences such as weapon jamming and/or flight deviation (firing high or low). These consequence occur naturally so it's also common to action them so.

The only confusion arising is over-thinking these steps. The inclusion of the recovery and problem phases is crucial for comprehension. A prime example is the spin test and its consequence. Does a spinning aircraft recover from the spin test brought about in combat? Not in the same turn if you follow the current rules. This is made overt through the inclusion of the Recovery phase before the testing which is done in the following Problem Phase.

Since play testing the scenarios from the Campaign mode solo, I've become quite familiar with several aspects of the game - tailing as well as how to shake a tail, multiple tailings (daisy chaining or the Lufbery Circle), familiarising oneself with restricted maneouvres apart from the climbing Immelmann (a favourite with many), understanding the numerous fire arcs for observers, involuntary stalling, landing/crash landing, strafing/retaliatory ground fire, bombing, gliding (extensively as in the Passchendale game), fire and smoke.

The fire arc diagram on some of the aircraft profiles can be mysterious to a noob (like moi). But the number is simply a reference to the fire arc permissible to that firer (see the rulebook for listing of the entire range).

Current rules to use: v3.62 (the only one presently available)
A revision is supposed to be happening soon. When remains speculative.

Fire damage ruling - Combat Table v6.0
Use only the fire damage section. For everything else, use...

...Combat Table - version Combat Table v6.2 (2016)
Simplified combat table

I do not use the Things To Know tables (there are two versions available). They are your Quick Reference Charts and may, or may not, be of use to the gamer.
b20f08
I do enjoy this game because it's a real one-on-one encounter, like gladiators. Your skill against your opponent. You win, you get a shot at the title. You lose, you dust fodder.

Lack of commercially available aircraft (in 1/72 scale) has prompted a challenge that I am mulling over: dare I start making my own Bristol M1C fighter (supposedly one of the best British-made but which was limited only to the Middle East), or Breguet 14B2 (as used by Americans in the latter stages of the war)? Anything is possible. Will keep you posted of future developments as they unfold. armata_PDT_34.gif

b20f08
Turns 17 & 18...

Turn 17
"With the drifting smoke getting in everyone's eyes, the scene above the combat zone resembles the moments before the end of a weekend dance in some woop woop town. Those with any sense have already left; those hanging back are trying some desperation tactics on the remaining wallflowers. Overall, it paints a really dismal scene. But a few smart ones are clicking on and are racing for the doors, hoping to score some illicit moonshine out the back of Ol' Harry's place, down Chugalug road."

Turn 18
"As the lights are dimmed, and the final waltz called out, those already yawning from the effort lazily head for the doors. Only they end up walking into the wall or doorway. "Terror" Thompson, the custodian glares at a couple of larrikins hovering around the table scrounging among the cups and bottles for a drop or two."

The game is warming up just as things are winding down. Only the last stores hex remains and the last remaining Brisfit is heading for it. On an intercept course is the lone German left on the table. Following him are a couple of Allied fighters. Elsewhere, the remaining French with a fuel problem are heading back to Allied lines anxiously looking at their emptying fuel gauges.
b20f08
Fokker Dreidekkers in flight
b20f08
IPB Image
Left to right: Steinhauser, Tuxen, Hemer, Mohnicke, J. Wolff, L. von Richthofen, Janzen, and the Red Baron himself, M. von Richthofen.
b20f08
Turns 19 & 20

Turn 19
"I have you now, Englander," yelled Cedric Maunchenleib (he had an English mother and had named him after her deceased father).
Thomas looked as the German opened fire with his twin spandau. The rat-a-tat-tat could be heard above the accompanying noises of their plane's effort over the target and the environment they were in. But he was feeling prescient at the very moment the rounds zipped towards his aircraft. Hall, the observer, was busy aiming his remaining bomb. Thomas steadied the plane as it slowly arced over the target.
"Bomb away!" shouted Hall. But he knew the pilot couldn't hear him. So he reached over and tapped his comrade on the shoulder. He was rewarded with a thumbs-up sign. The aircraft shuddered though as it took some hits from the German pursuer.

Turn 20
Suddenly there was another sound of guns firing. Hall turned around and spotted one of the Scots tackling the German.
b20f08
Turn 21 & 22

Turn 21
Bada-bing, bada-boom! And thus Maunchenleib fell as the last target went up in flames and destruction. All that remained for the Allies was to get the hell out of there and celebrate with high tea and scones!

Turn 22
Oh no! Thomas felt a slight twinge in his stomach. It was wet and sticky, like treacle bursting from its tin. Things began to get very dizzy just at that time…

Just a few more to go. Cheers.
b20f08
Currently gaming Scenario 6 - The Last German Offensive, May 1918. French taking on the Germans. Classic enemies. Once done, then it's on to Scenario 2 to finish the campaign. Good practice run for October.

(1) The collision optional rule has always been used since we started gaming CE. In the current game happening, three collision tests happen in one turn with only one pair passing their encounter.
(2) Same hex combat is now quite a common feature of large multi-plane games. And probably needs a re-examination given its limiting conditions on both planes. Example is when one aircraft enters a bombing hex. The only way to counteract this move is to approach the same hex from the same direction as the attacker; in other words, you cannot respond from any other facing other than from their six. Silly notion but that's how I interpret the ruling for any action in a same-hex setting.
(3) Formation flying versus individual "lone wolf" types. Lot of good positives flying in formation, especially with the slower two-seaters.
(4) Long range shooting is not worth it most times. It's a trend with this game to just go long burst and hope the guns do not jam. Medium range is really your long range. Close range or in the same hex is the ideal spot to be shooting from.
(5) Reloading guns is different from un-jamming the weapon, as I understand it. The former doesn't require a die roll but just to fly level and straight (unless it's the observer's guns) to reload, as I understand the rules. Please correct me if I am wrong, anyone. The logic is straightforward - replacing a drum is much easier than fixing a jammed gun.
(6) The solo adaptation are working fine but still require fine-tuning. My version of the Damage table is also working fine, maybe too well given the quick casualties that seem to be happening. But that's to be expected. Big games pose different problems to single contests.
(7) Crew wounds - whether Light or Serious - affect subsequent play. With Light wounds, it's usually a -1 penalty; with Seriously injured, it's a -3 penalty. Also, what I've learned is that when a crew is seriously wounded, it's best to get out of the game as fast as possible because you're useless as tits on a bull. Can't do a damned thing.
(8) Twin-linked MGs for your observers. Almost as good as your twin-linked forward MGs for your pilot.
(9) Bombing and strafing are very simple mechanisms and hardly worth a care given dogfights are the main purpose of the game. Maybe, so I've observed, the scoring is too easy (2-6 at altitude 1 or 2; 3-6 at altitude 3 or 4).
(10) Made use of all the planes listed in each of the scenarios. And been surprised by some of them. The more famous ones are famous for a reason. But some of the lesser-known are also quite good.
b20f08
Well here goes another double post....

Turn 23
With Monsieur Pierre's final close down sale happening that day, the French pilots were keen to leave as quickly as possible. Some were keen to purchase his excellent leather goods and accessories, stuff a pilotte demands and desires...

Turn 24
With the departure of the French, the lone German survivor of musical chairs also departs, escorted by a couple of likely lads in the Scottish enforcers, Landers and McAllister. "An' dun ye be comin' back, now laddie. Least wise Hamish and meself will be trottin' on your din, eh?" But to the poor Swabian lad, it sounded like "lslkdlk asdnoih fjiiekdl slkdk ksl".
b20f08
Final turns of the game. End in sight.... armata_PDT_34.gif

Turn 25
With all the target successfully bombed (not necessarily destroyed even if propaganda declares publicly otherwise through the local papers and bulletin sheets), it's time for everyone to leave the dance. The Scottish bouncers are doing their imitation of trains by shoo-shooing everyone out of their area.

Freremont and Thomas continue to gallivant northward, hoping to find a safe landing spot. Unfortunately, no one has bothered to correct their flight course. Their ultimate fate remains a mystery, so later reports established as they disappear into the "fog of war".

Turn 26
With the last guest departing, the Scottish lads start for their own home - a sheep's innard stretched multiple ways to resemble a hovel. Jacques is gliding his way closer to a date with some German bayonets. Or so we might believe. But the wily Frenchman has a secret weapon to stay afloat just that little longer - garlic. He chomps on them raw as he dodges multiple German-made rounds directed at his colourful aircraft painted to look like a giant red rooster. He responds to this overt sign of aggression and aggravation by projecting his French-made fingers back at the firers in the universally acknowledged sign of disapproval passionately before washing down his hasty meal with some fine French brandy. Ooo la-la! What a smell!

Turn 27
With the departure of Freremont and Thomas into the mists of history's unexplained and forgotten (to be revived in the early twenty-first century as something spectacular and sensationally relevant to those with smart phones....!), the arena is becoming very quiet. The Scottish lads are singing their way off-table; Jacques is experiencing moments of panic and relief (in alternating fashion, of course) while our Swabian lad is looking for a friendly airfield to take his wounded plane.

Turn 28
Jacques has made it. With a final push, he lands in No-Man's Land. Unfortunately Allied patrols have yet to locate the pilot and plane given its very close proximity to some very angry Wurttemburgers and Hessians. Not to mention both factions are engaged in a rivalry dating back several centuries (something about a sausage, a damsel, and a turnip). Anyway, the Allies cannot do anything except wait for the next "push", currently being planned by General Melchett, Haig's right-hand man.

Turn 29
Same as last turn only a bit more advanced (though not by much, so it would appear).

Turn 30
Strasser has finally landed after receiving the all-clear from a group of mademoiselles sun-baking on the roof of the mess hall. Luckily the young pilot understood French semaphore after spending time at the local French recreation area for displaced young soldiers (or Madame Chantal's). The two Scottish lads are still singing away as they approach Fritz's trenchline. The sound of their wailing is causing consternation among the more coherent Germans who think it's the Valkyrie come to collect on debts owed. This is leading to massed defections to the rear, to bunkers with locks on the inside, and so on.

======================================================
Summary
Game played out the full 30 Turns because of the gliding situation that occurred late in the game. I wanted to see if the French planes could make it. The rules states any 2-speed maneouvres means the aircraft descends one altitude every turn while 1-speed movement means descents occur every alternate turn. In the case of Jacques who was furthest from safety it was a close thing (he eventually ended up landing when he exited the table. He had to endure a few turns of being shot at by the enemy, but he survived.

Next batrep is Cambrai. Once more, I have gone with large numbers. For two tanks, it's a bit of an overkill. But I'm still fine-tuning the basic solo adaptation rules I devised; and the scenario seems a perfect vehicle (pun again intended) for review. Currently finishing off The Last German Offensive (May 1918). Using parachutes in that game; so far, no one has screamed out "God Save The Queen" and leapt out of their flying contraption. biggrin.gif
b20f08
New scenario. Fast forward a few months. Winter in 1917 was...wintery. But it didn't prevent the Allied High Command coming up with another means to "entertain the troops". With Christmas only a month away, the boffins at High Command Processing and Quality Control brought out their new invention -- armoured pizza delivery. Of course, the pizza delivery was front for peddling more salubrious products -- metrosexual homecare products, latest trench warfare fashions, and some delightful perfumes for those cloistered enclosed trench strongpoints, and much more). In order to pass muster with the frontline troops, they've called these metrosexual delivery cartages "tanks", or "Tremendously Adaptable New Kitchener Servitors".

Scenario 5: Cambrai, Nov 1917
Cambrai is the RV for these new product deliveries. German High Command, that stiff boned Junkerissmo, is stubbornly refusing to allow this delivery from taking place, as they know it will mean the end of the war, a terminus they are vehemently opposed to. Feeding propaganda to their frontline troops that these mechanical marvels are new terror weapons, they order an extermination order to the eager frontline commanders.

Start
The t.a.n.k.s plume into life, scaring the local French troops who thought they were mobile field kitchens-cum-heaters. Both commanders have decided not to invest their full forces in one dice roll instead choosing to send forth a van, like pawn to King four.

Turn 1
The Germans have an extra flight. And this unit of Rumplers quickly move to one side to allow the Dreis have centre stage. Opposite, the Allied DH5s advance resolutely southeasterly...

Turn 2
Nothing to report as both forces drive towards one another.

[url=https://wargamesandwritings.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/turn-3.png}Turn 3[/url]
The scene just before contact: the Rumplers realise their ruse to deceive the Allies is not fooling anyone. Both the English and Canadians target the Dreis. The t.a.n.k.s clank along No-Man's Land slowly, precious cargo secured.

=========================================================
Gone back to the standard (for me at least) 6' x 4' table. It condenses the action and will create very tight situations combat-wise. But the Allied objective is to win the game in 12 turns (the distant it takes to reach Cambrai). So one can safely surmise this will be a much quicker game than the previous two ventures.
b20f08
Turns 4 & 5

[urlhttps://wargamesandwritings.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/turn-42.png]Turn 4[/url]
What was, what is, what it shall be....
The opening shots are fired. One of the Canucks notice the sneaky Rumplers. Yelling something incoherently, he veers towards them, unaware that his heroics are his alone. And he would pay for his sudden bravado as the Germans thought he was collecting orders for the aromatic pizza smells emanating from the t.a.n.k.s exhausts.

Turn 5
More pizza delivery escorts arrived from the Allied side - French two-seaters (SPAD XIa), Australian fighters (Bristol MC1) and American-flown Breguet 14s. The combat heats up as the lone Canadian pilot (Osborne) is overwhelmed by the incoming German "orders" for the "pizzas". A second Canadian (Haggerty) goes into a spin -- just to show the Germans how it's done north of the American border.
b20f08
Got another get-together for CE this Sunday. Will post pics and batreps (if possible) next week. Cheers. armata_PDT_34.gif
b20f08
Turns 6 & 7

Turn 6
The pizza delivery vehicles are closing in on the centreline as one of the Canucks cops a fair wad of over-orders for Trenchline #5 - a delicate woody scent mingled with a brisk spring aroma of wild flowers and running water....

[ur=https://wargamesandwritings.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/turn-71.png]Turn 7[/url]
Ho, ho, ho. What is this? A shindig? The second wave of Central Powers arrive - three more German and one Austro-Hungarian units - just as the first Allied tank is destructed by one of the Rumplers.
b20f08
Turns 8 & 9

Turn 8
With so many new arrivals, the sky around Cambrai is "busy". Orders fly in thick and fast to the tank below. But as the tank is heavily armoured from "urgent orders", getting their attention requires some weighty persuasive tools.

Turn 9
The Allied escort are proving very obstructive as the German and their southern German cousins harangue the lone pizza delivery vehicle with their orders. Somehow, however, in all this frenetic activity some of the Germans forgot their pizza access cards, most of which were delivered by post. Unfortunately, the postal service at the time was a bit slow and primitive. And therefore failed to arrive in due time for many of the pilots. And, besides, what is this pizza thing, many were asking? The pizza delivery vehicle, meantime, crept ever closer to its destination.
b20f08
Climactic conclusion to this concentric confusion of chaos....

Turn 10
The sudden turnabout face of the new arrivals has been much thought over. The only conclusion drawn after all the debate and subsequent post-war analysis is that the entire group were vegans. Yes, that's right; caterpillar-loving, leaf-munching, green juice jiving herbivores. Unless they had an aversion to deisel-fumed overcooked cheesy-crusted and covered, fatty dripping, meat-plastered (with anchovy) flour-doughed weevil-infested circular pizzas. Only explanation.

Turn 11
As the arrivals are seen off by the few Allied planes still escorting lone tank Echo Five-Seven-Niner, Landship "Dolly", one adventurous pizza-loving German has snuck through the sieve-like defence to align himself for a strafing run. But in his over-enthusiasm, he forgot to exchange his normal bullets for pizza-fume seeking rounds. As a consequence, he failed in the most dramatic moment ever. He was later arrested for pro-pizza fondness on return to his station.

Turn 12
Cambrai awoke to find their fine bombed city reeking to the news, and aroma, of pan-based, cheese crusted and buffalo milk topping finest artifical Italian sourced cooking. The tank's arrival was warmly greeted by the many inhabitants, many of whom were running low on skin moisterisers, hand lotions, and hair gel. The Allied command's desperate plan had finally succeeded. The General was promoted and promptly retired to an appropriate static desk back in the Horse Guards. Cambrai would inspire Japanese manufacturers in an effort to modernise (after Tsushima) their bourgeoning vehicular fleet to name their first motorised rickshaw after the place. It was a mistake of course as the horseless carriage was able to outdo the work of the rickshaw which would eventually retain its place both as a tourist delight while acting as convenient break-down recovery vehicles for the motor car.

In the anals of history, Cambrai's place will forever go down as a major centre of focus during latter stages of the Great War. But far more than that, it would eventually be known as the birthing place of the metrosexual revolution. All hail the exfoliator! armata_PDT_36.gif
===================================================
New scenario tomorrow: The Last German offensive, May 1918
===================================================
b20f08
New game. Scenario 6: The Last German Offensive

Another "big" game. Ground targets but it's mainly a big brawl aerially. Cheers.

Starting Deployment
The Germans are lined up on the left ("west"), starting deployed over the Allied frontline trenches. No targets there. White hexes represent No-Man's Land. Pale green hexes are the rear echelon areas of the Allied lines. Or the French deployment zone.

Germans appear in their usual four-plane "flight" formations - two fighters and two ground attack aircraft (carrying bombs for this mission). The French are in three formations - two standard fighter "flights" and one large bomber flight (eight planes).

The ground attack/bombers have targets for extra "diversionary fun". Germans have two supply columns and troop formations in No-Man's Land while the French have two ammo dumps and local headquarters.

Objective is destruction of opposing aircraft. Secondary objectives are the successful bombing of each of the four targets. Cheers.
b20f08
Game One: Part One

Russians versus Germans
Game began simply enough with all the planes maneouvring for a shooting solution. The Roland's rear gunners were having a field day as my Russians seem to maneouvre into their gun sights. The Morane copped most of the fire, but both planes were unsettled. But things got worse when both planes ran into each other in Turn 7, exploding in a mid-air collision, much like in real-life when German ace Oswalde Boelcke ran into a fellow German flier in a contact. Boelcke died while the other pilot survived. In the game, one of the Russians died in the collision.

IPB Image
The game above is paused at Turn 7. The next batrep hexmap will feature Maxim and Igor. Will their fate be less dramatic? Have to wait and see... armata_PDT_34.gif
b20f08
Turns 1 and 2

Turn 1
Opening moves. No firing. Plans are unfolded and laid bare...well, what is seen in this first turn. No pizza deliveries. No metrosexual homecare products for sale. No dysfunctional displays. No silly attempts at humour. The French has a simple plane - steamroll every German target with their numbers. Flying Salmsons are the carriers of the bombs this scenario. Escorts are Moranes and SPAD.
Countering them is a similarly sized German attacking force of Hannovers (assigned the bombing mission), escorted by Fokker DVIIs.

Turn 2
The main French force head towards the "northern" targets solo; the French believe their numbers and defensive posture (flying tight formation) will see them through. The German "bomber" forces (2 separate flights) are heading towards the centre, escorted by the second escort fighters. To oppose them, the lead French fighter escort braces itself for the assault. The "reserve" are within strike distance but uncommitted so far. A pair of French Salmsons are heading "south" towards the enemy targets. This move is more a diversionary one;; hopefully it will attract German fighter escorts.
=========================================================
It is perhaps appropriate that the first contacts are initiated by two of history's better cavalry commanders - Seydlitz in the north and Lasalle in the south. I chose historical names for the final scenario of the campaign as an homage to these cavaliers of the air, something that was largely lost as a result of subsequent technological developments. armata_PDT_34.gif
b20f08
Turn 3 & 4

Turn 3
First casualty: Seydlitz
First target successfully bombed: German troop concentration
Commentary: Blucher leads his flight (purple planes) to the southernmost Allied targets. Grouchy and his wingman, Latour-Marbourg, aided by the lone Marulaz, race to intercept and disrupt. Centrally, Hautpol and d'Espagne confront the other German "bombers" temporarily led by Gneisenau (Scharnhorst is still in a spin) who are escorted by L'Estocq's flight of fighters.

Turn 4
Apart from a couple of planes smoking (Nansouty and Winterfeldt), no further planes are lost. There is a lot of shuffling for an advantageous post. Sahuc (with wingman Corbineau) passes over the German supply column and releases his bomb. But it fails to detonate. Nansouty, smoking, steers over the second German supply coloumn. Will he succeed with his bomb?
b20f08
Turns 5 and 6

Turn 5
The dogfights are there. But the emphasis seems to be more the "bombing" runs; action revolves around these movements. The Germans lose another fighter - Schwerin.

Turn 6
The Germans enjoy their first real success when Blucher successfully "bombs" one of the Allied headquarters. His movement towards the deep ones is the real motivation for these "bombers". For their fighter comrades, however, the dogfighting is as hectic as it is frustrating. The French seem to be enjoying the growing domination of the aerial combat arena.
b20f08
Turns 7 & 8
Turn 7
See Turn 8
Turn 8
The race to complete the secondary missions by both sides is blinding them to the opportunity to engage in some nasty dogfighting. Planes fall out of the sky nonetheless -- Marulaz, Wolfenbuttel, Scharnhorst, to name three. But others retire from the engagements seriously wounded (and therefore useless) - Hautpol and d'Espagne are two who start the trend by landing safely and getting medical assistance.
b20f08
Turns 9 & 10

Turn 9
Casualties on both sides mount up steadily. For the Germans, however, their losses compared to their opponents are more serious and permanent. Scharnhorst, Wolfenbuttel, Wartenburg all succumb to the deadly raking fire of the French guns. In reply, d'Espagne and Hautpol have been forced to land due to either their injuries (a seriously wounded flight crew can do very little other than land safely and head for the military aid station for a band-aid and lollipop).

One target remains "active" - the last French HQ which happens to be sited on the very "eastern" edge of the hexed map. Typical. Blucher and Wittenburg are making their unobtrusive but steady approach hoping for a clean run at the headquarter hex. They chosen a simple but effective route too.

Elsewhere is chaotic confusion: Lasalle has recovered from his second episode of spinning, Sohr is dogging Saint-Sulpice who is trying to shake his tail. Funnily enough, the Frenchman is also tailing Dobschutz who is looking to attack someone. Anyone. Winterfeldt is assisting the surrounded Gneisenau.

The remaining French planes are all congregating around the last active target. But there is little room to effectively manoeuvre, as Latour-Marbourg is finding out overshooting his post. And with Zeiten active in the vicinity, that window is becoming smaller. But three French bombers are closing in to help.

Turn 10
Blucher lines up the target just as Trelliard, one of the three French bombers, arrives to disrupt his attempt. The other legit German bombers are now paired up with a fighter escort; but no one knows if this is permanent or simply a fortuitous happenstance.
b20f08
Some of my latest builds for CE.
IPB Image
Roden's Fokker DVI. Painted up because the decals were long past their use-by date, and I needed an excuse to pull out the lazy paint brush. Came up reasonable. Also painted the underside which is more paler and pastel-ly.

Group shot of the planes assembled (labelled). The others are for comparison.
IPB Image
Apart from finishing off the Roden Fokker, the builds done are Revell Morane-Saulnier N (painted up as Russian Royal Air Force), a SE5a (painted up as part of the US aero squadrons that served in France), the Roden Fokker DVI (painted up to the Bavarian Home Guard scheme, as promoted by the instruction sheet), the Italeri Albatros (part of a two-plane set that includes the SE5a), and the Revell DVII.

Once I finish up the DVI, then it's on to the Handley Page bomber. Looking forward to spending a little more time on this plane. It even has a wire diagram which comes in real handy. Will post a final picture once assembled and painted. Cheers
b20f08
Turns 11 & 12

Turn 11
Only one Allied target remains active for the Germans who are losing planes fairly quickly; and these are not replaceable unlike their opponents. The French losses are recoverable as they are behind their own lines anyway, and they somehow all manage to land their aircraft safely -- which is a surprise to me gaming this scenario. Nonetheless, the damage done necessitating landing is because the aircrew are all seriously wounded and therefore a liability in the air (ie. heavy penalty for contact, limited maneouvring, inability to do any bombing, strafing, etc.).

Turn 12
With Blucher's hopeful attempt to successfully bomb the last remaining French target a failure, it is now up to a smoking Wittenburg. Elsewhere, the conflict in the centre (last turn) sees the Germans lose another fighter escort (Winterfeldt) to a direct head-on clash with Lasalle, seemingly recovered from his spinning episodes. The Germans are causing damage to the French planes, but they are not killer blows. Zeiten, the last of Seydlitz' flight decides to take it up another level by engaging French planes attempting to land. Thus he pursues Trelliard landing but is himself dogged by a returning Hautpol!

It's clear the remaining active target is the place to be. A simple plane would be to zealously patrol the area and wait for the Germans to attempt. But now fuel consideration is now entering the calculations. One Hannover is already leaving (Gneisenau).
b20f08
Turns 13 & 14

Turn 13
The second attempt at the last French target fails. Wittenburg disappears off the table with his smoking aircraft. His fate is unknown. The contacts are still happening with the Germans coming off worst. This time it's both Sohr and Zeiten who fall out of the sky. Blucher the closest "bomber" left is trying to return but faces a defensive cordon of French planes. Maybe he should just leave?

Turn 14
Gneisenau continues to fly towards home, his fuel situation a growing worry. Back at the combat zone, the contacts are busily engaging. Blucher comes off second-best with Montbrun tailing him. No one, however, spots Bismarck whose approach is masked by the smoke of the ammo dump "bombing". Is he? Can he?
b20f08
Tunrs 15 & 16

Turn 15
Time is fast running out for the Germans to collect that last bombing scalp. Bismarck, closest, gambles on a run even though his engine is shot up and he is gliding. To make things worse, his plane is on fire. Blucher has gone into a spin while Gneisenau has a change of heart (but that's like trying after the race has already been run).

Turn 16
Bismarck struggles to maintain control over his flaming aircraft as the ground races up to greet him. For a flickering moment flying into the HQ becomes a crazy option but the aircraft does not have enough motive power other than the wind beneath its wings. armata_PDT_34.gif

The French are congregating trying to reorganise themselves as they strive to protect the target zone from any further German attempts. But the Germans decide enough is enough and steer for home.
b20f08
Turns 17 & 18

Turn 17
Notable only for the race between Lutzow and Montbrun for the table edge. Lutzow will win although Montbrun really opened up the throttle pursuing him.

Turn 18
The remaining Germans try to pair up and make their escape. But the French have other ideas. Conclusion to this drawn-out scenario tomorrow. Cheers.
b20f08
Turns 19 & 20

Turn 19
With Montbrun “blocking” any chance of a clean getaway, Blucher turns “north”, tailed by Dobschutz, the only German fighter left. Gneisenau’s bold attempt wilters as the French block his way through. He therefore turns “north” as well and attempts to fly off the table.

Turn 20
The final move of the game sees Blucher and Dobschutz head north to escape the pressing attention of the French. Gneisenau has already departed.

Game over sees the French win the scenario decisively in two ways:

They have bombed successfully their designated targets
They are now the sole dominating force on the table.

The Germans fall short of their bombing assignments, and the last target proved to be a real jinx on them (two attempts for two failures). Their losses were also a contributing factor in losing the scenario:

Seydlitz’ flight: all four planes downed
L’Estocq flight: all bar Dobschutz downed
Scharnhorst flight: Gneisenau’s fate after flying off is unknown. Bismarck lands off-table and is captured. Scharnhorst and Wolfenbuttel were shot down.
Blucher’s flight: Wittenburg disappeared off-table; fate unknown. Blucher will also fly off-table. The remainder were downed over the combat zone.
=======================================================
These campaign games have been interesting namely because they have all been map games. Abstracting a game without figures is probably against the spirit of the wargame. But then Kreigspeil worked fine enough as a training aid for the Germans. It’s very reminiscent of the TEWTS (Training Exercises Without Troops), a familiar instructional method for field commanders of several decades ago. Similar concept, similar training methods, lessons learned and reinforced.

And so its use by myself has worked well enough in this situation. One simple benefit gained from these scenarios is the value of flying in formation, especially with two-seaters. Another has to be learning about the capabilities of the various planes of the times. But there are many other profitable gains from playing these campaign scenarios. The only criticism is that the solo rules I’m using still require fine-tuning but they still work adequately enough to offer an entertaining “game”.

This scenario would be the final in the campaign series designed by Lisa. But there is still Scenario 2: The Somme, Jul 1916, that hasn't been played out. I am currently engaged in this. Once done, I will present them as well.
b20f08
Scenario 2: The Somme, July 1916

Deployment & Start
Trenchline strafing and dogfighting. Germans facing superior numbers (roughly 1:2). Opponents are British flying a mix of planes - French Nieuports and British builts.

Only a few aircraft are Speed 3; the majority are Speed 2.
b20f08
Turn 1
The British commence their advance by gathering into clusters. In neat files they advance on the German trenches, fighter escorts in the lead. The Germans reciprocate although they can only do so singly because they lack numbers. But they have a few good interceptors among that few - Eindekker IV, Fokker IIs, and the Roland II "Walfisch". If they can get to grips early on, they might have a chance.

Turn 2
The opening contacts are circled in red flashes. The German plan becomes clear from the start: whittle down the odds by directly attacking the formations behinds the fighter escort screen. However one of their ground attack planes (Bachmann - not he of the Turner Overdrive fame) slips by the contact intent on delivery an early strike for his side. One of the German interceptors, Bauer, misses his opponents altogether, perhaps overwhelmed at the odds he is facing. But the rest of the Germans make contact further to the right of No Man's Land.
b20f08
Turn 3
The opposing forces resume their flights after contacting in Turn 2. The Germans are first to reach the British trench lines. It seems they are making for the AA gun positions whose identity are unknown (at least until the aircraft fly overhead). The British ground attack/bombers survive their initial contact but stick together while their fighter escort react to those enemy planes as best they can.

Turn 4
One of the German fighters has latched onto one of the British ground attack planes (Hill) while another is commencing his strafing run (Ponsonby). The Germans (Bachmann) is about to bomb the British AA gun position.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2020 Invision Power Services, Inc.